One friend came to my house with his newly acquired Nikon D90 DSLR camera. He pushed the LiveView button on the back and showed me the scene of my living room on the LCD screen of the camera. The scene looked yellow-reddish overall, just as I expected because of the mixed incandescent and compact fluorescent artificial lighting in the room. My friend commented that he liked the warm and fuzzy colors on the screen. He then proceeded to take a photo, and showed me the image in which the yellow-reddish color was significantly reduced. His comment was that the photo’s color looked worse.  He then popped up the flash and took another shot. The yellow-reddish color was completely gone. The photo looked like one taken in bright daylight. The comment from him? The color was bad! Read More…

Posted in Beginner Tips, Tips and Techniques on November 28th, 2009. No Comments.

Nowadays, camera manufacturers want you to believe their cameras are very sophisticated precision digital instrument that can take great photos effortlessly. There is some truth in the marketing literatures, but they don’t typically tell you at the same time that their cameras can also produce garbages if the users fail to use them properly. I admit, this is really not necessary for them to do so in the marketing materials and most camera manuals do come with such warnings. The matter of the fact is that many people have some unrealistic expectations from their cameras that cost them hundreds if not thousands of dollars. Read More…

Posted in Beginner Tips, Tips and Techniques on September 19th, 2009. 2 Comments.

In some shooting environments, flash photography is strictly prohibited. Often, the ambient light is so poor that the shutter speed becomes very low. In this situation, the photo can be easily affected by blurs caused by camera shakes and subject movement. 

If you are handholding a lens, the rule of thumb says you typically need 1/f (f is the focal length in millimeter) second of shutter speed. For example, if you are shooting with a 200mm lens handheld, you need about 1/200s or faster shutter speed to avoid most of the camera shake. This is for average people. Some one may have very steady hands, others may have especially shaky ones. If you have a lens with vibration reduction (VR), image stabilization (IS), or vibration cancellation (VC) functions, the speed requirement can be greatly relaxed. Often, you can shoot with up to 4 stops (or 16 times) slower shutter speed. Read More…

Posted in Beginner Tips, Tips and Techniques on September 3rd, 2008. No Comments.

For some unknown reasons, Nikon decided to skip the automatic exposure bracketing feature on the D40 and D40X DSLR cameras. For people who are interested in high dynamic range (HDR) photography using D40/D40X, this is a convenient feature that is missing. However you can still do HDR photography without it using D40/D40X. Here are two ways of doing that. Read More…

Posted in Beginner Tips on October 21st, 2007. 9 Comments.

If you are not sure what the differences are between “CMOS” or “CCD” image sensors, this Kodak article may help you to understand. Historically, CCD image sensors have superior image quality. However, CMOS image sensors have been catching up fast, starting from low end applications, especially in mobile phones, to high end applications, in DSLRs. Do you know who has the largest CMOS image sensor market share? Read More…

Posted in Beginner Tips on August 14th, 2007. No Comments.

This article on Yahoo! Tech site can get you started. After you read through the article (and all the links within), go to Digital Photography School to learn more.

Posted in Beginner Tips, Online Resources on July 21st, 2007. No Comments.
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